Tag Archives: art

Workflow

How to work out a workflow for thousands images?

Yes, that is right, I have thousands and thousands of images all shot over the past 5 months in Singapore, Bangkok, Jakarta, Toyko, Cork, Dublin, Vienna, Bratislava, Hong Kong, Delhi, Leh, Varanasi, Mumbai, Seoul, Daegu, Geochang, Shanghai and Jeju island.

Thousands of images shot on four different cameras: mainly iPhone, then Fuji X100t, Nikon D7000, and then some on a Sony Xperia Z5.

Where to begin?

Tokyo

I have series in mind, sure. Have begun on some of them already. But the main problem I have is storage. I back everything up numerous times: Google Photos, Flickr, MacBook, external harddrives. But the main devices I use are my iMac and iPhone for storage and, more importantly, editing. And I am constantly getting notifications of Storage Almost Full.

What to do? It took the best part of three days to get all the images (and videos) off the devices and on to the iMac. Before doing this, I had to delete over 100 gigs of photos just to free up space. And I am still nearing capacity on a 1.2tb on the iMac.

The way I like to organise things is like this: I import all photos onto iPhoto. I like the way it creates events and I can give them titles. It is easy to find images from certain locations then.

Then I go through the selection process of choosing (non iPhone – all of those are done on the iPhone) images to edit. The ones I like, I drag over to Lightroom and do the editing there. From that there is another selection process for images to post to my various social media platforms.

This is the way I have worked for years, and there probably are better ways to organise it all, but people do what they are used to doing.

One of my favourite quotes is this:

“Reduce Everything You Want to Do to an Action You Can Do Right Now.” Jason Randal

And for me it is this blog post. This articulation of what I am feeling. It clears a little space – just like deleting gigs on the computer – and allows me to take the next little step.

My father gave me the best advice in life: Don’t be afraid to ask for advice. Very often I feel I should have the answers myself; that I should be able to cope, and that perhaps asking for help or advice is an admission of failing. It is not.

My wife gives me the good advice.

I asked her. I said: I do not know where to start. I have too many images.

She said: What is your favourite place that you have been in the past five moths?

I said: Tokyo.

She said: Start there.

I am starting.

Imitation

Imitation

 

Posted in Brendan Ó Sé. Brendan Ó Sé photography, Daily posts to Flickr, iPhone 6s, iPhone photography, My own favourite photographs, Street Photography Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Pompidoo: A great camera bag

When Pompidoo Bags invited me to do some work with them, I jumped at the chance.

High up in the Himalayas with the Pompidoo Tokyo bag. (photo: Richard Delanty)

High up in the Himalayas with the Pompidoo Tokyo bag. (photo: Richard Delanty)

Straight up I am not a fan of those big bulky traditional camera bags with logos splashed across them. I have inspected some of them in camera stores and they’ve always struck me as being just too cumbersome and even a little ugly.

In action in Hong Kong (Photo: Y Ó Se)

In action in Hong Kong
(Photo: Y Ó Se)

I tended to opt instead for a messenger style bag; one that fits comfortably. Sure they are not designed for cameras, but you can get a camera into them. However, when I saw the range of bags from Pompidoo, I knew these were bags designed by people who have the awareness of the needs of a photographer and the creative ability to come up with a bag that actually is functional and stylish.

In action in Hong Kong

In action in Hong Kong

Being on a trip in Asia in the past few weeks, I have used the Tokyo bag (I just got to love the name!) all the time. From Hong Kong to high up in Himalayas to the streets of Seoul it has been with me. What I love about the bag is that it is not flashy. For the type of photography I do, the last thing I need is to look like a photographer. The aged-looking raw leather is soft and even if it does pick up a scratch or two along the way it will only add to the look. The bag is minimal in style. There are two compartments which easily accommodate my Nikon D7000 and my Fuji X100T. There is a front pocket which is perfect for other accessories like extra batteries, chargers, SD cards and so on. The high-quality European production is built to last and serve you through the years.

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Inner compartments of the Pompidoo Tokyo bag

Inner compartments of the Pompidoo Tokyo bag

The padded inserts in the bag offer reassurance when packing my suitcase. I can just put my gear into the bag and the bag into my suitcase. No need for bubble wrapping like I used to do before.

All in all, the bag has two things which are winners for me: It doesn’t look like one of those flashy, hey-I’m-a-photographer-with-a-big-bag-of-gear bags; no it is discreet and stylish. And the second thing is that it is that it does the job.

So, if you are like me, that you do not want to be a walking advert for a company with a big, bulky camera bag, Pompidoo’s Tokyo bag is for you. Check them out.

Pompidoo offer a range of stylish and functional camera bags on their online store. Go check them out and if you like one, here is a 10% discount codeBrendan10%. It is valid until August 31, 2016.

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Posted in Brendan Ó Sé. Brendan Ó Sé photography, photograph posts Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Which of these photographs are iPhone 6s and which are Nikon D7000?

Imitation series: Tokyo, April 2016. Images shot on iPhone 6s and Nikon D7000. All edited on Snapseed on iPhone.

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Tokyo: Blur will save the world

Posted in iPhone, photograph posts, Street Photography Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , |

M i n e

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Posted in photograph posts Also tagged , , , , , , , |

Bangkok: The slow rhythm of patience

Had a discussion with a friend of mine about photography and how we use it to interpret what we experience. I told him that very often when I arrive in a city it overwhelms me and to begin with everywhere I point my camera seems to be the wrong place. I said it takes time to slip into the rhythm of a city, to feel its pulse beat in time with mine and then it just becomes instinctive.

Bangkok

Bangkok

Bangkok was like that. An assault on the senses. The smell of petrol fumes fused with lemongrass. The neon and fresh fruit stalls. The hum of the constant traffic. The swell and sway of people always on the move. The welcoming smile and the 100-mile gaze.

Bangkok

Lady boys’ boutique – getting ready for the night ahead

At every turn there was something which got my attention; something which I had to capture in a frame.

Lady boys' boutique - getting ready for the night ahead

Lady boys’ boutique – getting ready for the night ahead

I had not visited the red light district on my last visit to Bangkok, but this time we were brought on a little tour by a Japanese friend.

Bangkok

Bangkok

Impossible to compute it all. The luxury of photography allows time to reflect.

Bangkok

Bangkok

Let the camera see.

Bangkok

Bangkok

Bangkok

Bangkok

The slow rhythm of patience

Bangkok

Bangkok

 

Posted in iPhone, photograph posts, Street Photography Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Bangkok

I like writing. I like writing about the background to images, but sometimes it just becomes noise and distracts the viewer. A bit like titles. I used to title all my photos before, but now unless a title pops into my head, I don’t bother.

So, in that spirit, here are three photographs from Bangkok.

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Bangkok: March 2016

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Bangkok: March 2016

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Bangkok: March 2016

 

Posted in iPhone, photograph posts, Street Photography Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Monogram Asia Photo Lecture Tour

It was quite the honour to be invited to South-East Asia by Monogram Asia to present at the Royal Photographic Society of Thailand and also in Jakarta, Indonesia. In between, I had the opportunity to shoot intensively with some fantastic photographers on the streets of Singapore, Bangkok and Jakarta. All in all, it was a never-to-be-forgotten experience and one I am truly grateful for.

Presenting at the Royal Photographic Society of Thailand

Presenting at the Royal Photographic Society of Thailand

In preparing my lectures for the two events, I approached it in a chronological fashion, presenting images of mine through the years, both DSLR and iPhone, and framing them around that famous quote of Henri Cartier Bresson’s: Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst.”  and the widely-used: “The best camera you have is the one with you.”

And I disagreed with both!

The reason being is simple. Bresson’s quote is often used to present the idea that the more you practise the better you will become, and while it is wrong to disagree with that, it does imply a linear, incremental improvement. Coming from an education background, I believe the learning process is never as simple as this, and when looking at it through the lens of artistic creation it seems to suggest that we are incapable of creating something of artistic merit in our initial stages of expression. It brings to mind a couple of  Picasso’s quotes: “Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up.” and It took me four years to paint like Raphael, but a lifetime to paint like a child.”

One of my early street shots: Bangkok, 2005

One of my early street shots: Bangkok, 2005

These two quotes support my belief that very often we can instinctively create something without a technical awareness of how we achieved it. In preparing for my presentation I looked back at images I shot many years back. Seeing these now, with years’ of experience of shooting and viewing images, I realised that back then I was capable of creating photographs which, if I were to shoot today, I think I would be proud of.

It got me thinking further about his quote. 10,000 photographs. Just think about that for a moment. 10,000. Back in the days of film I had an SLR. It was rarely used. I would have shot a few rolls when on holidays and another few throughout a year. Do the math on this and you can see that in a given year, I would have shot about 8 rolls of film. That is 8 x 36, making a total of 288. Continuing with the calculations you can see to get to 10,000 probably would have taken me about 35 years. Or in reality – never.

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One of my early street shots: Hakodate, 2009

However, with digital,  things changed. There was the reduced cost and the ability to store so many images. This resulted in shooting more and more, and brings me to the next quote: The best camera you have is the one with you.”

This has to be one of the most-often used quotes about photography. I know I have I used it again and again. But it was not until I was mulling my presentation over that I realised that I did not agree with it. Why? Because it implies that we don’t always have a camera with us and if we do happen to have one – then that by default is the best camera.

Untrue!

Who doesn’t have a smartphone with them nowadays? And following that through it means we always have a camera with us. And that is the best thing – always having a camera with us. But do we realise the potential of that?

An early iPhone photograph: Cork, 2011

An early iPhone photograph: Cork, 2011

I found looking back over the years of my photography that it was from always having a camera with me, in the form of my iPhone, that led me from a situation of only having a camera in a drawer gathering dust, only taken out on special occasions, to one where I had a camera with me always. I went from a situation of perhaps (and perhaps is true here)  noticing a photo opportunity, to thinking – wow, that would make a nice photograph, to a situation where I saw these situations and I had the camera with me and I got that shot.

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From cameras in a drawer to always having a camera with me and always trying to get that shot

It allowed me to develop my eye, to begin to think and to see photographically. It allowed me to have a camera with me in situations where before I would not have brought one: work, shopping, waiting rooms, in the car, out for a run, around my house and garden, etc. And as a result, I was training my eye, becoming more sensitive to composition, becoming more creative and moving ever-more rapidly to those 10,000 first photographs.

Sure, the quote can be interpreted in different ways. I fully agree with the notion it implies of practice. Shooting with the iPhone meant I was practising more than ever before, but the change was that I was now seeing photographically and committing myself to it. Before a photographic scene may have gotten my attention, but if I had not a camera with me, it would have been allowed to escape, uncaptured. And over time this meant a sensitivity to scenes like this became less and less pronounced and opportunities to train my eye, evolve my style would have been lost. 

In looking back and selecting images to represent my early photographic style it was good to see that elements of composition, style and storytelling were strongly evident in my early shooting, and to see how these evolved over the years was interesting.

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Capturing storytelling images on the iPhone 4

The next part of my presentation was to show that there is not a separation in approach, style or quality between what I was doing in my DSLR work and my iPhone work. With the iPhone I had a camera that was perfect for street photography. It was small, discreet, fast and allowed me to get in close on the streets to capture moments and candid portraits that I probably would not have made without this camera. In turn, because of this new approach, I was becoming braver with the DSLR also and making more effort to get storytelling images on the DSLR.

Similarly, I wanted to show that the limitations of the iPhone: poor zoom, poor image stabilisation pushed me to be creative. I zoomed with my feet, and the poor image stabilization; well it led to this:

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Being creative on the iPhone

And around the same time I was creating images like this on my DSLR.

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DSLR photograph

I also spoke of the community aspect of the mobile photography movement in my presentation. I know that for me it was (and still is) the interaction with fellow photographers who were shooting and sharing on smartphones on a daily basis that really drove me on. Being part of communities like Mobiography, The App Whisperer and iPhoneographyCentral was hugely influential in my development as a photographer. Making the showcases on these sites was a really big thrill for me in the early days and I am so grateful to Andy, Joanne, Bob and Nicky for all they have done and continue to do for mobile photography.

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The wonderful community for mobile photography: Mobiography, The App Whisperer, iPhoneographyCentral

Throughout the lecture, I presented images to showcase my photographic style and to demonstrate the qualities and advantages of the iPhone. As well as showing images from through the years, I also I selected some of my more well-known images.

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London, 2015

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Tokyo, 2015

 

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Tokyo, 2015

God will send a sign. When he does be prepared.

Copenhagen, 2014

I rounded the presentation off with a demonstration of my favourite app for editing: Snapseed and showing the range of Olloclip lenses available for the iPhone that bring your shooting experience to another level.

There followed a questions and answers session and after the presentations in both Bangkok and Jakarta I was very pleased with the people who took the time to come up to thank me, to hear their stories, tell me they found the talks inspiring and motivating for them to experiment and shoot more with their smartphones. I really enjoyed the opportunity to get some wefies (a new word for me – more than one person is not a selfie no it is a we-fie – wefie) and to take pictures of us together.

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Royal Photographic Society of Thailand Lecture

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Jakarta Lecture

For me, the takeaway points from my lecture were having a smartphone camera with you allows you think and see photographically, heightening your ability to look for and create photographic opportunities; it encourages creativity and allows you to develop your own personal style. With the community of mobile photographers you have the opportunity to share and learn with fellow photographers who share your passion and with the many apps and accessories available you can take your photography to another level. But the main thing: The main thing is that it is PHUN – iPHUNography!

Overall, the opportunity to present my photography in the prestigious Royal Photographic Society of Thailand and in Veteran’s Cafe in Jakarta was a true honour and one I am humbled and grateful for.

Will be doing a few blog posts on shooting in the various locations on the blog in the coming weeks. I shot over 5k photographs on the iPhone, Nikon D7000 and the Fuji x100T. I had the most amazing experiences shooting with a great team of photographers. Stay tuned!

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More to come…

 

 

 

Posted in iPhone, iPhone 6s, iPhone photography, Photo Talks, photograph posts, Street Photography Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

IMPOSSIBLE HUMANS – THE UNEXPECTED HAPPENING

Impossible Humans – The Unexpected Happening.

What is it? This is it!

A visionary performance of contemporary art, music and new visual arts, where The Pollock Project’s jazz meets the visions of the mobile artists all around the world.

How can you apply? Here are the details and here is the Flickr group

I am so proud to be a jury member for this competition. The idea behind the competition and event is such a noble one. Andrea Bigiarini – the organiser says:

“At the heart of the show is the common man in its uniqueness and originality.”

Andrea is a big-hearted inspirational character who believes in the power of art to bring people together. And this is what the competition and the event will do! Don’t miss out.

Check out Dieter’s video!

“Be human. Be unexpected”

Posted in Uncategorized Also tagged , , , , , , , |

Two photographs

Getting to that time of year when I look back and choose my favourite photographs posted to Flickr over the past year. I began to do this last night and the thing I noticed was this year I posted far fewer images to my two Flickr accounts than 2015. Last year, between the two accounts I posted close on 700 photographs. This year between the two it will just be over 200. Over the next few weeks, I will be choosing an iPhone photograph and a non-iPhone photograph from each month of the year and writing a little background as to why I have chosen those images.

For today, I am posting two shots. One DSLR, taken in Vilnius – part of a little series of images. The curious thing about this is that I had not a title ready for it, but when I uploaded to Flickr, from some reason the title I gave it was the same as the Apple shot. No reason why and not even sure why. But you have to go with these things at times.

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God will send a sign. When he does, be prepared.

 

The iPhone image is from my trip to Porto back in June. I shot a lot from this scene. I like this particular one because of the bird in the scene. Hope you like it too.

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Porto

 

Posted in Daily posts to Flickr, iPhone Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , |

121 Clicks

I have admired 121clicks website for so long – easily one of the best websites for photography there is. And it’s always a thrill when an image of mine is selected for their top-class Flickr group, so when I was asked to do an interview for them I was particularly delighted.

You can read the interview here.
Thanks to Sid for doing the interview with me.
Hope you enjoy the interview.

121 clicks.jpg

Posted in Uncategorized Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , |