Tag Archives: Travel Photography

Hong Kong

Five weeks in Asia. Five different countries. Five weeks shooting. Result: I have thousands of images to sort through. While away I was mainly shooting with the iPhone, but I also had the Fuji X100T and Nikon D7000 with me. So, my way of dealing with the images this time is a little different than before. My plan is to go back and organise the images from each location and put together blog posts on each place. This should allow me to work my way through the process of selecting (and more difficultly – deselecting) my favourite images. So, here goes.

Where better to start than Hong Kong. Oh to be a street photographer living in Hong Kong. What an exhilarating place it is. I really would love to live there and get the chance to work more of the series of images I have shot on iPhone there.

Ferry to Hong Kong (shot on iPhone)

Ferry to Hong Kong (shot on iPhone)

I had two short stays there in the summer. The second was extended when a typhoon hit and resulted in a long day spent in the airport. I was never so happy to leave when I did, but now I am longing to get back and hit the streets of Hong Kong again.

Hong Kong (shot on iPhone)

I love the vibrancy of street life in Hong Kong. It is a noisy, colourful and fragrant place. What I like most about it is that you can find a location and work it, or if the mood takes you and you do not mind dealing with the heat and humidity you can keep on the move. Both work just as effectively. Also, in Central, the architecture is just amazing. I came across this wonderful yellow facade in Central and spent some time trying to get a shot which might match what I envisaged once I saw this yellow.

Hong Kong (shot on iPhone)

Hong Kong (shot on iPhone)

I spent about 20 minutes or more trying to get the shot below. You can’t have it both ways. I love that Hong Kong is so crowded and there is a constant flow of people, but when I was trying to get this shot I was driven mad by the people walking into my frame. For me, when I am shooting I create an image of the shot I want to get in my head before I shoot. This one I had envisaged to have more of a division between the yellow wall and the passing red taxi and yellow of the bus.

Hong Kong (Shot on iPhone)

This one, which lacks the red of the taxi, worked a little better. Still, it is not perfect. Is any shot ever?

Hong Kong (shot on iPhone)

Moving up the road from here I found a wonderful entrance to McDonalds – another yellow wall. Another chance to create some fun images. This time I pushed the iPhone up against the wall and hit burst mode to get these split screen reflection shots. Again, in getting this shot I was hindered by the fact that the white van opposite was parked and for the duration I was there shooting did not budge. I had hoped to add more colour to the shot but alas no. Photography is 99% frustration. 99% of the time, or even more, I do not get the shot I imagine in my head.

Hong Kong (Shot on iPhone)

That’s me in the corner standing in front of a bus stopped in traffic trying to get these layered reflection shots you get when you shoot into glass. I like the result here with the guy’s eyes framed in the way they are here.

Hong Kong (Shot on iPhone)

I just love the colours you find in Hong Kong. This intersection in Central is one of my favourite locations. The bright yellow painted markings of the crossing are so vibrant and when you throw in the colours of the traffic and the pedestrians it all adds up to great photo opportunities.

Hong Kong (Shot on iPhone)

Hong Kong (Shot on iPhone)

And more yellow.

Hong Kong (Shot on iPhone)

Hong Kong (Shot on iPhone)

And who can resist the cliche shots when you come to Hong Kong? You can’t pass them up really.

Hong Kong (shot on iPhone)

But you can blur it up a little.

Hong Kong (Shot on iPhone)

I have been saying how shooting with the portrait mode on the iPhone has changed how I shoot on the street. In Hong Kong, I met some characters, none quite as animated or as colourful as this guy.

Hong Kong (shot on iPhone)

Hong Kong (Shot on iPhone)

Or these friendly guys.

Hong Kong (Shot on iPhone)

Hong Kong (Shot on iPhone)

If you see it, it’s too late. How true this so often is on the streets. The image below appeared to me as I was walking along checking the shots I had just made. Someone using a paper clip as a cigarette holder. How cool. I had to quickly get things lined up to get the shot. Again, it could have been better – crisper, more in focus. But still I like it.

Hong Kong (Shot on iPhone)

Hong Kong (Shot on iPhone)

Look up, look up. Hong Kong has great architecture.

Hong Kong (Shot on iPhone)

Hong Kong (Shot on iPhone)

Hong Kong (Shot on iPhone)

One of the fun things I did this summer with the iPhone was to shoot with the Provoke App. I just love the black and white images it produces. Here are number of those shot in and around Central.

Hong Kong (Shot on iPhone)

Hong Kong (Shot on iPhone)

Hong Kong (Shot on iPhone)

Hong Kong (Shot on iPhone)

See you next year, Hong Kong!

Next up Seoul!

 

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Iceland

Where to begin with Iceland? Well, I guess a good place to start is the place you start from: the airport.

A good friend of mine told me have my camera (in this case my iPhone) ready as I travelled on the bus from the airport to downtown Reykjavik. He was right. The landscape on this slowly-darkening Iceland winter evening was unlike anything I had seen before. The colours, faint in the low and diminishing light were oranges and browns, whites, yellows and greys; ones I had not seen before. Their texture dimpled and bumpy as little mounds of volcanic earth and rock stretched out along the road. In the distance were snow-capped mountains.

The view from the bus from airport to downtown Reykjavik (Shot on iPhone 7 plus)

The onboard announcement switched from Icelandic to English. The voice was calm and pleasant and stated it hoped I would enjoy my time in Iceland, and to return. Most certainly, I thought. It took about 50 minutes from the airport to arrive in the centre of Reykjavik on the Flybus. As you edge further into the city a skyline of mountains appears in the distance and as you approach the sea appears at their foot.

When I got off at my stop, retrieved my suitcase, zipped up and turned east (as I had been directed by my AirBnb host who for some reason preferred cardinal directions more than my requested, and more easily understood, left or right turn ones), the sharp wind shot at me causing me to speed up and find my apartment. Once installed, I ventured out to see that seafront and those mountains.

View of Mount Esja (Shot on iPhone 7 plus)

Reykjavik is small. Iceland is small. As capital cities go, it is probably the smallest I have been to. It is quaint and yet modern. It has grim, grey streets of uniform council-type housing and other streets of striking modern designs. The main street, Laugavegur, has no big-brand shops. The first time I walked along it I did not realise it was the main street. From there I strolled up to iconic Hallgrímskirkja church, and from there a walk back down to the parliament area and then across to the stunning new opera house: Harpa. Walking back along the seafront as the sun began to set on my second day in Reykjavik, I felt I had seen the town. It is that small. As the week would go on I would return two more times to Harpa. I am a big fan of modern architecture and this building is just simply delicious when the light streams in and throws shapes and shadows which strut and cut the sharp angles and fluid curves of the vast interior. I loved this place.

Harpa Opera House (iPhone 7 plus)

Harpa Opera House (Shot on iPhone 7 plus)

Hallgrímskirkja Church (Shot on iPhone 7 plus)

The week would go on and I would be busy with teaching at the University of Iceland. In time off before or after classes, I tried to walk as much as I could and Reykjavik is a city which is perfect for that. The weather was not too bad when I was there. Below zero temperatures, cloudy skies, a biting wind, but no snow. The cloudy skies meant that I did not get to see the Northern Lights. This, I must say, was a real disappointment, but as I told my hosts, it means I have a good reason to return to Iceland.

When Friday came I had the afternoon  free and one of my hosts, Toka, kindly offered to bring me on a little tour of the Reykjanes penisula which is a short trip from Reykjavik. We headed west with the low-lying Icelandic sun breaking through the clouds. Sitting in the passenger seat seeing the road opening out in front of us, the sky seemed vast. Snowy mountains flanking us on all sides, I braved the icy wind and holding my iPhone with great care I shot little video clips as we made our way around this beautiful peninsula.

The highlight of this short tour was the stop we made at the Blue Lagoon. Earlier in the week I had tried to arrange a visit to this iconic location, but was disappointed to learn it was fully booked out. Toka delighted me when she told me, that while it was not possible to bathe in the lagoon, you could still wander around. Perfect! The stark contrasting colours of the greyish black volcanic rock and the neon blue of the thermal water is stunning. As the steam rises from the heat of the water it gives it an ethereal feel and adds to the experience. One thing that shocked me was to see people sipping on beer and cocktails while bathing. While disappointed I had not the opportunity to fully experience the Blue Lagoon, there was some compensation in being able to use thermal pools in the Laugardalslaug public baths, which within walking distance of my apartment. They may not have the magical feel to the Blue Lagoon, but it was something else to shiver in the freezing cold as I tipee-toed from the changing room to the outdoor swimming area. It’s bliss once submerged in the hot water.

Bathers enjoying a drink in the Blue Lagoon (Shot on iPhone 7 plus)

Renting a car in Iceland is best done online and make sure to shop around as prices do vary a lot. I got a Citroen C3 from rentalcars.com and paid an extra €20 to get a GPS and a WiFi router.  It was money well spent and made my tour of the Golden Circle so much easier to navigate. The Golden Circle takes in some spectacular Icelandic sights: Þingvellir National ParkStrokkur Geyser (yes, that is where the word geyser comes from, and the jaw-dropping Gullfoss Waterfall. I left Reyjkavik at about 8 in the morning and got back to the car rental depot a little later than 6 in the evening. Taking in the three stops, stopping for the many photo opportunities, and spending about 45 minutes for lunch, the day flew past, but still I felt I had seen a lot of the spectacular landscape and some of its famous inhabitants – the beautiful and gentle Icelandic horses.

Icelandic Horses (iPhone 7 Plus)

Icelandic Horses (Shot on iPhone 7 plus)

Pingvellir National Park (Shot on iPhone 7 Plus)

Geyser Erupting (Shot on iPhone 7 plus)

Gullfoss Waterfall (Shot on iPhone 7 Plus)

Iceland is not cheap. I can safely say it is easily the most expensive place I have visited. It really cannot be done cheaply. Eating out is expensive and even supermarket food in the budget supermarket Bonus is costly. I paid about €15 for a cup of coffee and a sandwich in a little cafe in Reyjkavik city centre.  A beer is about €10, and an average main meal in an average restaurant is north of €20. However, the food is great and must be sampled. Check out Cafe Loki for some fine Icelandic food. It is easy to find; just look for the big church and it is directly opposite you.

From May, Wow Air will offer direct flights from Cork to Reykjavik to go along with the existing direct flights it offers from Dublin. Tourism is booming in the country and the infrastructure to cope with the increasing number of visitors is being stretched. New hotels are being built, but more and more locals are offering their apartments on AirBnB, and I reckon this is the best option at the moment.

All in all, Iceland is not to be missed.

Iceland (Shot on iPhone 7 Plus)

Reykjavik (Shot on iPhone 7 Plus)

Reykjavik (Shot on iPhone 7 Plus)

Iceland (Shot on iPhone 7 Plus)

Iceland (Shot on iPhone 7 Plus)

Iceland (Shot on iPhone 7 Plus)

Iceland (Shot on iPhone 7 Plus)

Iceland (Shot on iPhone 7 Plus)

Reykjavik (Shot on iPhone 7 Plus)

Reykjavik (Shot on iPhone 7 Plus)

Reykjavik (Shot on iPhone 7 Plus)

 

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Seoul and Shanghai with the Sony Xperia Z5

Every camera has its charm and does something better than another. One of the reasons I love to shoot with the Xperia Z5 (read my review here) is the wide angle. It is so perfect for architecture shots that fill up the frame. The series of images in this post were taken in Seoul and Shanghai in July and August of this year.

Shanghai (Sony Xperia Z5)

Shanghai (Sony Xperia Z5)

Two huge world cities. Seoul, for me, feels like the biggest city I have been in. I know Tokyo is probably bigger, but when I am there it gives me the sense of lots of small little towns centred around a train station. Seoul seems to just go on for ever and ever. Shanghai, the world’s most populated city, appeared quiet to us in August. I kept saying to my wife: “Where is everyone?” Sure, there were a lot of tourists around the tourist spots, but wandering around the city over the five days we were there, it did seem a little quiet.

Shanghai (Sony Xperia Z5)

Shanghai (Sony Xperia Z5)

I never will forget the absolute amazement we experienced as we ascended the escalator and came out on the circular walk way in the middle of those skyscrapers in Pudong. Wow! If you have seen the film Her, this is one of the locations they shot in. It is truly like time travelling.

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Shanghai (Sony Xperia Z5)

Shanghai (Sony Xperia Z5)

Shanghai (Sony Xperia Z5)

When you get to places like this you can end up with a pain in your neck as you tilt back as far as you can to take it all in, but you should not forget to look for other ways to see things. I loved the reflections of the skyscrapers in the rainy rooftops of cars.

Shanghai (Sony Xperia Z5)

Shanghai (Sony Xperia Z5)

Getting to see Shanghai from one of these skyscrapers is a sight to behold. We were lucky the day we were there as the forecasted rain never came and the view from the IFC building of Shanghai was quite good. We had been told that the queues to get up to the viewing floor would take about 40 minutes, but we were lucky, we got up in about 10. It was well worth the wait.

Shanghai (Sony Xperia Z5

Shanghai (Sony Xperia Z5)

However, this good weather was not to last and the forecasted rain did come. But hey, rain is just another opportunity to get shots. This one was taken through our hotel room window. You can see the Oriental Pearl Tower is obscured by the heavy and dark rain clouds. It was fun to watch the clouds pass and finally clear over this fabulous view.

Shanghai (Sony Xperia Z5)

Shanghai (Sony Xperia Z5)

A friend had suggested that a great place to get a view of the city was Hotel Indigo, and he was right. We got there just before sunset and the views were spectacular.

Shanghai (Sony Xperia Z5)

Shanghai (Sony Xperia Z5)

Shanghai (Sony Xperia Z5)

Shanghai (Sony Xperia Z5)

Seoul

I spent three days in sunny Seoul this August. Over the three days I walked over 50km in the blistering heat. And I loved it. Seoul is flat and relatively easy to navigate and if you do happen to get lost like I did, Koreans are so friendly and helpful. (Read my experience here.) I loved shooting wide with the Xperia in Seoul. It seemed so perfect.

Seoul (Sony Xperia Z5)

Seoul (Sony Xperia Z5)

Seoul (Sony Xperia Z5)

Seoul (Sony Xperia Z5)

One of the most amazing locations in Seoul is the wonderful Dongdaemun Design Plaza. This is one of the many must-see sights in Seoul. Designed by Zaha Hadid and Samoo, this futuristic structure is a sight to behold, and in 2015 was the most hashtagged location from Korea on Instagram.

Dongdaemun Design Plaza. (Sony Xperia Z5)

Dongdaemun Design Plaza. (Sony Xperia Z5)

Dongdaemun Design Plaza (Sony Xperia Z5)

Dongdaemun Design Plaza (Sony Xperia Z5)

 

 

Posted in Brendan Ó Sé. Brendan Ó Sé photography, photograph posts, Sony Xperia Z5, Street Photography Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Portraits from India

Before heading to India, my travel companion (who is a seasoned visitor to India) asked me what I wanted from the trip.

Leh, India. July, 2016

Leh, India. July, 2016

“To satisfy the stereotypical images I have in my head of India”, I replied. “You know the classic Steve McCurry type shots.”

“Who is he?” Not being a photographer, he hadn’t heard of him.

“You know that photograph of the Afghan girl; it was on the cover of National Geographic? That one, you know that? Steve McCurry… shots of India like he gets. Really dramatic, colourful scenes with equally colourful and dramatic characters.

“Oh, ya”, he replied and his left eyebrow raised a little as he responded.

“I want to shoot, shoot and shoot and get all the stereotypical images and then discover India for real.”

You cannot beat exuberance and naivety.

Varansi, India. July 2016

Varanasi, India. July 2016

Off I headed to India with a head full of imagined scenes I was going to shoot. Now of course I didn’t get those Steve McCurry-type shots, but I did try. Who doesn’t? It reminds me of the maxim I apply to life and to art:

Imitate – assimilate – innovate

I have written about this before. It goes like this: We absorb so much of what we experience it is inevitable that we imitate. It puts us on the path of learning and discovery. Then our own interpretation and style gets into the mix as we assimilate, and as we progress we use this as a springboard for our expression as we begin to innovate. But the thing is that it is not linear. At any stage in the process we are imitating, assimilating and (hopefully) innovating.

Varansi, India. July 2016

Varanasi, India. July 2016

In this spirit, I tried to satisfy those stereotypical images of India I had created in my head from seeing Steve McCurry’s shots. Now, of course I am no McCurry, but I did enjoy shooting these portraits.

Varansi, India. July 2016

Varanasi, India. July 2016

Funny though, when I look at these portraits now, it is not the person in the frame that I remember, but rather the immediate environment surrounding them and the sensation that I was missing out on something real, something more exciting than this paused-posed-and-paid-for moment. (Ya, in Varanasi you have to pay ten rupees (about €0.13) for a portrait. These guys are professionals.)  In India, it is impossible not to feel you are missing out on something. It is intense, overwhelming and relentless. It is like stepping back in time, but stepping on to a treadmill that is propelling you forward at speed. Your senses are bombarded and overloaded. It is hard to put into words, but unavoidable to try to capture in images. For me, the portraits were nice, but ultimately boring. What was happening around these people while I tried to get their portrait was much more interesting, and much more challenging.

Varansi, India. July 2016

Varanasi, India. July 2016

Varansi, India. July 2016

Varanasi, India. July 2016

India!

 

 

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Hong Kong and India with the Sony Xperia Z5

Been travelling around India for a few weeks and before that had a few days in Hong Kong. Shooting with the Sony Xperia Z5 is great for those wide angle shots.

Below you can see some photos from the iconic Victoria’s Peak in Hong Kong, Victoria Harbour, the magnificent Taj Mahal, the monasteries of Leh, in the Himalayas, and the stunning Pangong Lake on the India China border.

View of Victoria Harbour from The Peak, Hong Kong

View of Victoria Harbour from The Peak, Hong Kong

View of Victoria Harbour from The Peak, Hong Kong

View of Victoria Harbour from The Peak, Hong Kong

Taj Mahal, Agra, India

Taj Mahal, Agra, India

Leh, Ladakh

Leh, Ladakh

Leh, Ladakh

Leh, Ladakh

Pangong Lake, Ladakh

Pangong Lake, Ladakh

Pangong Lake. India China border

Pangong Lake. India China border

Pangong Lake, Ladadhkm (this lake borders India and China)

Pangong Lake, Ladadhkm (this lake borders India and China)

 

 

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Vienna with the Sony Xperia Z5

Had the pleasure of visiting Vienna last week on a university exchange. It is hard not to be struck by the grandeur of this European city. Below are a selection of photographs shot on the Sony Xperia Z5. It is a fine travel camera and I really enjoyed shooting with this while there.

Vienna has over 1.200 kilometres of bicycle paths. Being a bike lover, I really enjoyed this.

Vienna has over 1.200 kilometres of bicycle paths. Being a bike lover, I really enjoyed this.

With the River Danube passing through the city, there are many bridges.

With the River Danube passing through the city, there are many bridges.

Vienna was home to some of the world-renowned artists like Egon Schiele and Gustav Klimt. The Belevedere Museum is home to'The Kiss' Klimt's most famous painting.

Vienna was home to some world-renowned artists like Egon Schiele and Gustav Klimt. The Belvedere Museum is home to’The Kiss’ – Klimt’s most famous painting.

And of course it is also famous for its composers. Here is a statue of Mozart.

And of course it is also famous for its composers. Here is a statue of Mozart.

A visit to Vienna has to take in the wonderful architecture and vision of Friedensreich Hundertwasser.

A visit to Vienna has to take in the wonderful architecture and vision of Friedensreich Hundertwasser. This is the entrance to his museum. I was lucky enough to get to see an exhibition of Martin Parr’s photography while there.

Here is another of Friedensreich Hundertwasser's famous buildings. Wouldn't you love to live here?

Here is another of Friedensreich Hundertwasser’s famous buildings. Wouldn’t you love to live here?

There are many beautiful churches and cathedrals in the city. Saint Stephen's cathedral is right in the heart of the shopping centre of the city.

There are many beautiful churches and cathedrals in the city. Saint Stephen’s cathedral is right in the heart of the shopping centre of the city.

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The city’s main shopping area.

One of the things I loved about Vienna was the amount of street art. Vienna has a wonderful canal area where young people gather in the evening.

One of the things I loved about Vienna was the amount of street art. Vienna has a wonderful canal area where young people gather in the evening.

In the evening the banks of the canal are lined with young people having a few drinks with friends.

In the evening the banks of the canal are lined with young people having a few drinks with friends.

The beautiful rooms of Belevedere Museum.

The beautiful rooms of The Belvedere Museum.

The Vienna underground

The Vienna underground.

Entrance to Karlplatz Underground Station

Entrance to Karlplatz Underground Station

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Little India, Singapore

I really loved this experience of visiting Sri Veeramakaliamman Hindu Temple in Singapore with my friend Elfie (Monogram Asia). This was something new for me and I was fascinated by the rituals taking place and the music playing in the temple. The people were welcoming and it was a great opportunity to observe and learn. 

I have put together this little photo essay of images shot on iPhone 6s below. The final black and white image was shot with the Nikon.

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Shoes at the entrance to the temple

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Bells on the entrance door to the temple

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Sri Veeramakaliamman Hindu Temple

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Sri Veeramakaliamman Hindu Temple

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Sri Veeramakaliamman Hindu Temple

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Sri Veeramakaliamman Hindu Temple

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Sri Veeramakaliamman Hindu Temple

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Sri Veeramakaliamman Hindu Temple

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Sri Veeramakaliamman Hindu Temple (Nikon D7000)

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Travel and Photography

The only thing I miss about my days of being single is the freedom it gave me to travel when I wanted. Nowadays, with a small family it is not so easy to decide on a whim to head off to visit new places. Still though, I am very fortunate that I do get to see new places, albeit with less frequency.

Being married with kids has also changed my perspective on travel. Now, the prime concern is to keep the kids entertained and happy. Once that is achieved, then we can enjoy ourselves too. My secondary concern is to get out and shoot. To see what can be seen and how to see it. And travelling to Asia there is just so much to see. It is an assault on the senses and at times it is just overwhelming.

On our recent trip to Asia, which took in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Korea and Japan, I took thousands of photographs using both my Nikon and iPhone. Before going I was so excited. Five weeks in Asia. Five weeks to shoot street photography. Five weeks! Did I have a plan, vision, a project in mind of what I wanted to shoot, to document? Not really. I prefer to allow these things to take their own form; for me to react to what I encounter and not to be restricted by trying to find certain things.

In saying that, there were things I knew I wanted to see and shoot. I wanted to continue with the abstract blur series of people in motion, with both of my cameras. But besides that I was open. I told myself I would be brave and if that shot appeared I would not allow my timidity to get in the way of me getting it. This sometimes worked out and other times didn’t. In later posts, I will have some good stories to tell about situations like this.

However, this approach can result in a lot of clicks, a lot of snapping. I remember the day I arrived in Tokyo, exhausted after an early morning start and little sleep, leaving the hotel and getting out on to the famous Shibuya Scramble Crossing. Now, as my stay went on I came to feel electrified here, but the first time I stepped out on that sunny Saturday afternoon, I knew I should be feeling something and I was, but I was not able to identify what. With the Nikon around my neck and the iPhone in my hand, I was obliged to start shooting. So I did, but with no real purpose or understanding of what it was I seeing or how it could be seen. After about an hour or so I returned to the hotel frustrated. Here I was in one of the most amazing cities in the world, a street photographer’s paradise, a place I had been dreaming about and I did not know what to do or how to do it.

The next day, I met up with one of my favourite photographers – Michael Kistler – who lives in Tokyo and we spoke a little about this. I didn’t make a big deal of it and neither did he. I guess both of us knew this would pass. We spent the day together on a photo walk around Shibuya, Harajuku, Yoyogi Park and back again to Shibuya. Now, I am a big fan of Michael’s work. It is inspirational. Being with him, seeing how he shoots, seeing what gets his attention amongst the frenetic momentum of Tokyo is fascinating. I guess living there he has a greater feel and understanding of the city and its people. I was a visitor, a tourist. He was part of it all. There appeared a logic to his photographing. I was on the outside of it and the shots I was taking were disjointed. Later that evening, I headed back to the hotel, I was not quite as frustrated as the previous day, but still.

Now that I am back and I see the thousands of photographs I have taken over the five weeks and as I look through them I begin to see what I wanted to see. I am beginning to understand it, to see its patterns emerge. And if, by magic, I could walk out my door and step back into it all, I would know how to shoot it. I would know how to connect those dots to create something cohesive and expressive. But, I am a believer in things are as they are. What I shot was what I saw at that time. If I went back now, I would have a different sensitivity and quite possibly miss or ignore the things I saw then. I was a tourist. I was an outsider. And that is OK. The images I made will present that. Perhaps the next time I get to travel I will have more of a focus about what I want to see and what I want to shoot.

It gets me thinking. When I was in Hong Kong, one of my friends asked me why I take photographs. Without hesitation I replied that I took them because I it helps me to understand what I see. And to add to that now, I realise we cannot predict what we will see. So maybe, not having a plan, being free and open to what I encounter is OK.

Thanks for reading. Would love to hear your own thoughts on travel and photography. Do you set out with a plan? Do you feel frustrated when you get back and see patterns emerge that make you feel you missed out; that you need to go back and see and shoot it again?

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Asia: Spring 2014

 

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